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10 Questions for Evangelistic Conversations

10 Questions for Evangelistic Conversations

Dr. Don Whitney has a great resource on his website called, “Ten Questions to Ask to Turn a Conversation Toward the Gospel”.  Actually initiating a gospel-focused conversation is usually the hardest part.  Here are ten questions he has found helpful for turning a conversation toward the gospel:[1]

  1. When you die, if God says to you, “Why should I let you into Heaven?”, what would you say? Are you interested in what the Bible says about your answer?
  2. If you were to die tonight, where do you think you would spend eternity? Why? Are you interested in what the Bible says about this?
  3. Do you think much about spiritual things?
  4. How is God involved in your life?
  5. How important is your faith to you?
  6. What has been your most meaningful spiritual experience?
  7. Do you find that your religious heritage answers your questions about life?
  8. Do you have any kind of spiritual beliefs? If what you believe were not true, would you want to know it? Well, the Bible says . . . .
  9. To you, who is Jesus?
  10. I often like to pray for people I meet; how can I pray for you?

 

 

[1] Copyright © 2002 Donald S. Whitney.

Copyright Disclaimer: All the information contained on the Center for Biblical Spirituality website is copyrighted by Donald S. Whitney. Permission granted to copy this material in its complete text only for not-for-profit use (sharing with a friend, church, school, Bible study, etc.) and including all copyright information. No portion of this website may be sold, distributed, published, edited, altered, changed, broadcast, or commercially exploited without the prior written permission from Donald S. Whitney.

 

The Book of Heavenly Wisdom

The Book of Heavenly Wisdom

Adoniram Judson believed deeply in the power of the written Word. So firmly did he rely on the power of the Scripture that he printed and distributed his own tracts to a people who were not highly literate. Though the common person had some elementary literacy level, it was uncommon to spread news in general through the printed page. However, Judson still sought to spread the gospel through literature and Bible. Against all conventional wisdom, he was remarkably successful in his tract distribution. Having seen the amazing conversion fruit of tract distribution in Burma, he penned this poem, relishing the Word and its power to draw souls to Christ.

He never saw

The book of heavenly wisdom, and no saint

Had told him how the sinner might be saved.

But to his hut

A little tract—a messenger of love,

A herald of glad tidings—found its way.

The hue

Of death was on his cheek.

His burning brow

Told of the pain he felt.

Still no saint was near

To tell of joys to come.

No man of God

Stood by his bed to soothe the final hour;

But he had peace.

“When I am dead,” he saith, “put ye the little book

Upon my breast, and let it go with me

Down to my sepulcher.  It taught me all

That I have learned of God, and heaven, and hell.

I love the man who wrote it, and that God

Who brought it to my home.”[1]

 

[1]Middleditch, Burmah’s Great, 288-289.

Four Essential Traits of a Cross-Cultural Urban Christian Mission Agent (P2)

Four Essential Traits of a Cross-Cultural Urban Christian Mission Agent (P2)

For the followers of Christ to effectively obey the Great Commission to preach the gospel into all the world and make disciples of all the nations, it is indispensable, indeed, for an urban Christian mission agent to have a cross-cultural, multilingual mindset.

We already mentioned in the first part of this discussion two of the four habits of the mind that a cross-cultural urban Christian mission agent should develop, namely:

  1. A passionate love for the Triune God and a strong love for people. (Matt 22:36-40)
  2. A healthy self-love and self-esteem in Christ. (Rom. 12:1-3)

Equally important with the first two traits, the next two are a must have as well.

  1. An attitude of lifelong learning and open-mindedness is an essential attribute of a fruitful urban mission agent of change.
    1. As a lifelong learner, he continues to develop and expand his competencies in evangelizing, establishing and equipping of the saints and re-think these ministry skills from a different cross-cultural perspective. He will learn the biblical and contextualized ways of ministering to men, women and children of different cultural backgrounds.
    2. When the urban discipler is humble, teachable and open-minded, he’ll do everything in his power to be diligent in learning the language and studying the cultural milieu of his target ethnic groups. He will learn of their ways of thinking, communicating and doing things. In fact, he, with an open mind and a learner’s heart, can learn a lot of life lessons from these international immigrants whom he seeks to reach out and minister.
  1. A teacher-developer-capacity builder mindset is absolutely necessary for an urban Christian ‘missionary’ to be effective in reaching the metropolitan dwellers of different socio-economic, educational, cultural, work and family backgrounds.
    1. For the urban missionary to be able to effectively evangelize, establish and equip people, he should have the creative ability to do and teach the Scriptures from the spiritual milk of the very basic presentation of the Gospel of Christ to the more spiritual solid food of the reign of the Triune God through all eternity (Heb. 5:12; 1 Cor. 3:2).
    2. It is only through the Spirit-empowered teaching and learning of the Word of God can lives be truly transformed. Besides the knack of teaching one-on-one, small group or a large crowd, the urban Christian worker should be passionate in developing disciplers, training disciplemakers and raising leaders from among the people of his target international ethnic groups. (2 Timothy 2:2)

Indeed, there could be more of the important traits and mindsets needed for urban Christian workers, disciplers and lay leaders to have. But anyone can’t do without these four essentials.

Four Essential Traits of a Cross-Cultural Urban Christian Mission Agent (p1)

Four Essential Traits of a Cross-Cultural Urban Christian Mission Agent (p1)

In times past, foreign mission agencies made the acquisition of cross-cultural skills an absolute requirement for their missionary candidates to possess before sending them out to the ends of the earth. In today’s modernized and highly urbanized world where 54% of the 7 billion people on earth live in cities, the importance for an urban Christian mission worker to have a cross-cultural mindset can’t be overemphasized. The multilingual, multicultural harvest field is right here in the cities! This is why it is imperative for urban Christian workers to acquire the necessary cross-cultural traits.

In North America and Western Europe, for instance, immigrants from more than 100 countries and speaking more than a hundred languages settle in the huge cities of these hemispheres. The harvest field is just right next door. For the followers of Christ to effectively obey the Great Commission to preach the gospel into all the world and make disciples of all the nations, it is indispensable, indeed, for an urban Christian mission agent to have a cross-cultural, multilingual mindset.

Here are four habits of the mind that cross-cultural urban Christian mission agents should develop to be effective and fruitful in the ministry that God has called them to do:

  1. A passionate love for the Triune God and a strong love for people should be the urban Christian mission agent’s most compelling motivation for engaging in the tasks of evangelizing the nations and discipling and equipping the saints. (See: Matthew 22:36-40; 2 Corinthians 5:14-21)
    1. The urban Christian mission agent should be growing in his love for the Triune God – enjoying the practice of the presence of the Father, immersed in the sacrificial love of the Son and walking in the power of the Holy Spirit.
    2. Without this compelling love divine in one’s heart, loving people can truly be an uphill climb. Urbanites, in particular, who are stressed out and emotionally strained due to city living, can sometimes be really annoying and irritating. This requires a high level of tolerance for any cross-cultural worker to have.
  1. Related with the first trait, a healthy self-love and self-esteem in Christ is an essential habit of the mind that urban Christian missional agents should hold.
    1. An accurate valuation and acceptance of one’s person enables the urban Christian workers to be free from harmful attitudes of ethnocentrism. It liberates them from criticizing the idiosyncrasies of other ethnic groups or lambasting and judging other cultures according to their own cultural ethos.
    2. A healthy self-love and self-acceptance empowers the urban Christian trainers and disciplemakers to pursue authentic relationships with those who are not culturally or linguistically like them. This mindset helps them raise their own intercultural awareness and cultural sensitivity as they interact and serve these international immigrants.

For a fruitful life and ministry in their sphere of influence and outreach, it is imperative for the urban Christian workers, disciplers and lay leaders to be growing strong and deep in their love for God, for people and for themselves.